News

Tweaking an exercise routine to stay strong after 50

Written by Dorene Internicola (Reuters)

People turning 50 may want to consider tweaking their exercise routines because as they age stiffer joints, slower recovery from injury and the loss of lean body mass are among the perils facing the youngest baby boomers, fitness experts say.

Staying strong after 50

Studies have shown that even a 90-year-old can build muscle, so the half-century mark is a good time to retire joint-stressing high jumps and to start lifting dumbbells to build strength.

Dr. Wayne Westcott, co-author of the book “Strength Training Past 50,” said maintaining lean body mass becomes harder with ageing.

“The average man in good shape is about 85 percent lean weight, organs, blood, bones, muscles and skin, to 15 percent fat. The average healthy woman has a 75/25 ratio,” said Westcott, fitness research director at the South Shore YMCA in Quincy, Massachusetts… [ Read More» ]

Exercise to Age Well, Whatever Your Age

Written by Andrew Pollack | NYT

Offering hope and encouragement to the many adults who have somehow neglected to exercise for the past few decades, a new study suggests that becoming physically active in middle age, even if someone has been sedentary for years, substantially reduces the likelihood that he or she will become seriously ill or physically disabled in retirement.

The new study joins a growing body of research examining successful aging, a topic of considerable scientific interest, as the populations of the United States and Europe grow older, and so do many scientists. When the term is used in research, successful aging means more than simply remaining alive, although that, obviously, is the baseline… [ Read More» ]

Consider Adding “Pre-Habilitation” to Your Exercise Recommendations

Written by Brittany Cushman | Holistic Primary Care

At some point in life, 80% of the population will suffer from back pain, a primary cause of musculoskeletal degeneration and also one of the top reasons for visits to a physician.

What most people—including many doctors—do not realize is that a primary cause of problems like back pain is physical inactivity.

The truth is that long periods of time spent in sedentary postures in our cars, at our desks, in front of the computer or TV result in a progressive deterioration of muscle and joint function, and significantly compromise our ability to move with ease and fluidity. A sedentary way of life results in joint ailments, as well as over-used and abused muscles.

Yes, it is possible to overstrain muscles by sitting improperly and for too long!

fitnesscoachingTo compound the matter, a de-conditioned body is at much higher risk of injuries, so when sedentary people suddenly decide to exercise—for health, for enjoyment, or both… [ Read more» ]

Due to icy conditions Easton class cancelled Day, Mon. 3nd